Dogwood Logging Plan in Gualala River is Back!

By the time of this reading, the Dogwood plan could be beyond the deadline for public comments. If, however, it has been postponed, please visit Friends of the Gualala River (www.gualalariver.org) where you can get details on commenting to the record. Our win in court didn’t necessarily save the Gualala River floodplain but the court told GRT they had to take into account the cumulative impact of Dogwood and other logging plans along the river. This and other issues will be addressed by legal staff.

Felta: Last Wild Coho Creek in Russian River Watershed

Felta Creek Threatened By Aggressive Logging Plan

UPDATE:  LOGGING HAS BEEN APPROVED by Cal Fire!

(A Donations button earmarked for Friends of Felta Creek is located at the end of this article)

June 19, 2017, Healdsburg, CA — As wild Coho salmon have disappeared in every tributary of the Russian River watershed over the past decades, Felta Creek remains the rare exception. Even in the low fish years of 2006 and 2008, endangered wild Coho salmon survived in the shady pools of this boulder strewn west county stream. This spring, UC researchers discovered multiple spawning beds, or “redds,” in the creek’s gravel bars. But the fate of this fragile habitat now lies in the hands of an absentee landowner with an aggressive logging agenda.

In late 2015, Humboldt County resident Ken Bareilles bought a 160-acre Timberland Production Zone property that includes a core section of Felta Creek’s headwaters. Bareilles, a logger and lawyer, filed a Timber Harvest Plan with CalFire (formerly the California Department of Forestry). Barring some act of intervention, the plan — THP 1-17-017 SON (Fox Meadows) — is on its way to approval.

The fact that Bareilles’ plan progressed this far this quickly has alarmed both professionals and community members. Of the 160-acre property, registered forester Randy Jacobszoon’s plan calls for logging on 146 acres. Of that, 130 acres are slated for Group Selection and Transition Harvest — essentially, aggressive multi-acre patch cuts. According to the California Geological Survey, “site slopes range from 10 to 80 percent gradients … geologic mapping identifies dormant and active deep-seated landslides as underlying the plan area.” How will heavy equipment, logging and hauling during the winter affect a slide-prone landscape?

“I have reviewed logging plans in Sonoma County for over 20 years, and this is one of the worst,” says Larry Hanson, president of Forest Unlimited. “First, there is the delicate and biologically important stream that runs through it. Second, there are critical safety issues related to school children and local residents who use this one-lane dirt road to get in and out of their homes. Finally, there are climate impacts.”

NOAA and the National Marine Fisheries Service, recognizing the critical need to protect this watershed, recommended a more sustainable approach to limit erosion and preserve more of the forest canopy. In a public meeting on Thursday June 15, 2017, Anthony Lukacic, the CalFire official in charge of recommending the proposed timber harvest plan for approval, said one of NOAA/NMFS’s recommendations made it into the final plan. He considered but rejected others, deciding that CalFire’s Forest Practice Rules would suffice if adequately implemented.

According to Russian Riverkeeper, the stakes couldn’t be higher. “Losing one of the single best juvenile Coho Salmon habitats on Felta Creek that get baby Coho through the hot summer months would be a massive blow,” says Russian Riverkeeper president Don McEnhill.

Community members and county officials are alarmed by the scope of the proposed hauling operation. The landowner has an easement to use Felta Creek Road, a private one-lane gravel road that winds above Felta Creek. Four full-time families reside there amidst some grape cultivation. The use and maintenance of this rural road have been sufficient to balance light traffic and the health of the fishery. But Felta Creek Road has never been an industrial logging haul road.

Community members have been told to expect 13 logging trucks per day in 6 separate shifts. Two wooden bridges, privately installed and maintained, have not been inspected to see if they can withstand this kind of impact. There are sharp turns around big trees, few turnouts, two waterfall crossings, a mile-plus section of road susceptible to sedimentation of the creek. At the bottom is Westside Elementary School, with over 170 students, some who walk down Felta Creek Road to attend classes. Most students and families use Felta Road, a publicly maintained county road where school traffic is already congested.

No traffic impact or safety studies were completed as part of the timber harvest plan. At the June 15 public meeting, CalFire’s Lukacic asserted that the hauling operation was a civil matter. A certified engineer’s letter questioning the suitability of bridges, numerous concerns about sedimentation of the creek, fire and public safety issues and threats of litigation have all been filed during the public comment period, set to close on June 26.

What could all this mean for the last recognized habitat for wild coho salmon in the entire Russian River watershed? One local timber operator who reviewed the plan predicted: “this is going to be ugly.”

According to one official at the CalFire meeting, agencies were concerned about Ken Bareilles’ record of land abuse: a cleanup and abatement order with the Regional Water Board in 2002, as well as CalFire violations. A March 12, 2012 California Department of Fish and Wildlife press release[1] reported what inspectors saw at a Ken Bareilles-owned Humboldt property:

“… soil stock piled next to or in the stream channels, removal of riparian vegetation and poorly installed stream crossings. DFG then filed a formal complaint against Bareilles and he was convicted.

During a storm in January 2012, the team then returned and witnessed sediment entering streams and flowing downstream toward Redwood Creek during the salmon and trout spawning and rearing season. As the rain continued, video was taken of an estimated 10 cubic yards of sediment becoming saturated and flowing like lava into one of four affected streams on site.”

Bareilles’ THP zoned property also happens to be for sale. This means a buyer or coalition of buyers could potentially prevent logging in this critical watershed.

“There has to be a better way,” says Felta Creek Road resident Dan Imhoff. “We have to protect all the healthy habitats that remain in this County.” Imhoff helped start the organization, Friends of Felta Creek, to mount a community response and conservation outcome to the proposed timber harvest plan.

FOLLOW-UP AND HOW YOU CAN HELP

Good news: The THP has been sent back by the director for major revisions. See the accompanying article on this. However, it may come back with changes that still don’t fix the larger impacts.

Tax exempt donations can be made to Forest Unlimited for the “Friends of Felta Creek.”  This DONATE button designates funds specifically for Friends of Felta Creek:



Contact 707.303.6091 for more information.

[1] “Humboldt County Attorney Convicted of Multiple Land Use Violations,” from CDFW News, March 12, 2012, web edition

Annual Redwood Seedling Reforestation Project

This January, Forest Unlimited will be planting approximately 1,600 one-year old redwood seedlings for reforestation and erosion control.

The planting dates are yet to be determined.

Forest Unlimited will provide trees, all equipment and a free indoor lunch, including drinks and snacks. Vegetarian food will also be available.

If you would like participate in our January planting, please contact our Reforestation Manager, Elaine Wellin at elaine.wellin@sonoma.edu.  Further information on the rendezvous location, appropriate attire, etc. will be sent to all volunteers by mid December.

Dinner Under the Redwoods

 

Please join the fun at our Fourth Annual Summer Dinner under the redwoods.   Great food, lively music, awards and current forest news.  Plus a special guest:  Dr. Morgan Gray will give an informative talk about wildlife landscapes, connecting habitats, and habitat fragmentation.  Dr. Gray will present information gained from her interesting research in several counties including Sonoma, Mendocino, Napa, and Santa Cruz counties.  Dr. Gray has researched the implications of land use on mammals, and is currently in conversation with land trusts and state and federal agencies with interests in landscape scale conservation.  Come learn the latest science on how wildlife respond to smaller habitat areas and the challenges of crossing from one island habitat to another.  Dr. Gray is a post doctoral researcher at U.C. Berkeley and Pepperwood Preserve.

Forest Unlimited will also presenting an Environmental Activist award to Jim and Leonora Wilson for their work in protecting the Napa County watershed.

When:  Saturday, June 10, 2017, 3-6pm
Where:  Anderson Hall, Camp Meeker
Live music:  All Swing Considered,  A four person gypsy/jazz ensemble.  Great for dancing!
Food:  Wild salmon is back as well as veggies on the grill!  There will be side salads, appetizers, and desserts.
Tickets: $50 salmon/$35 veggie per person before June 1. $60 salmon/$40 veggie after June 1.  Mail check to: Forest Unlimited, PO Box 506, Forestville CA 95436.  Please write “Dinner” on the memo line
or
Tickets Online: Click the “Donate”  in the sidebar.  Be sure to indicate that this is for the Annual Dinner.
Further information: call 707-887-7433 or email larryjhanson@comcast.net.

Don’t miss it.  Mark your calendar now!  This is a fundraiser for Forest Unlimited.