June 30, 2018: Dinner Under the Redwoods

Join us for a barbecue under the redwoods!

Please join the fun at our Fifth Annual Summer Dinner under the redwoods.   Great food, lively music, awards and current forest news.  Plus a special guest: Dr. Chad Hanson, Director and Chief Ecologist of Earth Island Institute’s John Muir Project will give an informative talk .  Dr. Hanson will present information gained from his interesting research on fire ecology.   He is the author of The Ecological Importance of Mixed‐Severity Fires.

Forest Unlimited will also presenting an Environmental Activist awards to a deserving forest activist.

When:  Saturday, June 30, 2018, 3-6pm
Where:  Anderson Hall, Camp Meeker
Live music: To be determined
Food:  Wild salmon is back as well as veggies on the grill!  There will be side salads, appetizers, and desserts.
Tickets: $50 salmon/$35 veggie per person before June 1. $60 salmon/$40 veggie after June 1.  Mail check to: Forest Unlimited, PO Box 506, Forestville CA 95436.  Please write “Dinner” on the memo line
or
Tickets Online: Click the “Donate”  in the sidebar.  Be sure to indicate that this is for the Annual Dinner.
Further information: call 707-887-7433 or email larryjhanson@comcast.net.
Don’t miss it.  Mark your calendar now!  This is a fundraiser for Forest Unlimited.

January 2019: 20th Annual Redwood Seedling Reforestation Project

This January, Forest Unlimited will be planting approximately 1,600 one-year old redwood seedlings for reforestation and erosion control.

The planting dates are yet to be determined.

Forest Unlimited will provide trees, all equipment and a free indoor lunch, including drinks and snacks. Vegetarian food will also be available.

If you would like participate in our January planting, please contact our Reforestation Manager, Larry Hanson at larryjhanson@comcast.net. Further information on the rendezvous location, appropriate attire, etc. will be sent to all volunteers by mid December.

Forest Connectivity

In the 1980s, an ecologist named Thomas Lovejoy conducted an unusual experiment in Brazil’s Amazon rain forest. As loggers moved in with chain saws to clear trees for cattle pasture north of Manaus, he asked them to leave untouched several small “islands” of forest to see how the animals within them fared.

The results were unsettling.  Read more.

 

Coastal redwoods battle heats up along the Gualala River

by Will Parrish, Bohemian.com

The fight to save majestic coastal redwood groves in California has been waged for more than a century, starting with the campaign that created Big Basin State Park in 1902.

A RIVER TRICKLES THROUGH IT According to the EPA, the Gualala River has been “impaired” due to sediment caused by logging. - RORY MCNAMARAIn 1978, the Sierra Club dubbed its successful campaign to expand Redwood State and National Park the “last battle” of “the redwood war,” but the battles to protect this globally recognized icon of nature would only intensify.

In 1985, a junk-bond dealer named Charles Hurwitz engineered a hostile takeover of Humboldt County’s most respected logging company, Pacific Lumber, and folded it into Houston-based investment company Maxxam. Meanwhile, Louisiana-Pacific, a Georgia-Pacific spin-off, was cutting its more than 300,000 acres in Mendocino and Sonoma counties at roughly three times the forest’s rate of growth.

“We need everything that’s out there,” Louisiana-Pacific CEO Harry Merlot told the

Press Democrat in 1989 “We log to infinity. Because it’s out there and we need it all, now.”

This unruly phase of the story involves the birth of radical environmentalism on the North Coast, complete with tree sits and road blockades, and culminates in the campaign to save the largest remaining area of unprotected old-growth redwoods in California, and thus the world: the Headwaters forest, located between Fortuna and Eureka. President Bill Clinton made saving Headwaters an election pitch in 1996, and in 1999 the state and federal governments purchased 7,500 acres to establish the Headwaters Forest Reserve.

Continue reading “Coastal redwoods battle heats up along the Gualala River”

Going dry fast – Part 2

by Will Parrish, Anderson Valley Advertiser

Voluntary Measures

For years, wine industry leaders have opposed regulation on the grounds that it is burdensome and of questionable value. California agribusiness representatives have consistently maintained that they can manage their properties in an environmentally responsible manner without the need for government oversight. In the case of the wine industry, the leading edge of this effort is a marketing and certification initiative called “fish friendly farming” which has certified 100,000 acres of vineyards, including a majority of those that suckle at the banks of the Russian River.

The initiative was developed by the California Land Stewardship Institute (CLSI), a nonprofit organization based in Guerneville.

“I’m not a big fan of regulations,” the group’s executive director, Laurel Marcus, said in an interview. “I think they lead to a lot of conflict.”

Continue reading “Going dry fast – Part 2”